Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale
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The New York Times bestseller and definitive history of Christianity for our time—from the award-winning author of The Reformation and Silence

A product of electrifying scholarship conveyed with commanding skill, Diarmaid MacCulloch''s Christianity goes back to the origins of the Hebrew Bible and encompasses the globe. It captures the major turning points in Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox history and fills in often neglected accounts of conversion and confrontation in Africa, Latin America, and Asia. MacCulloch introduces us to monks and crusaders, heretics and reformers, popes and abolitionists, and discover Christianity''s essential role in shaping human history and the intimate lives of men and women. And he uncovers the roots of the faith that galvanized America, charting the surprising beliefs of the founding fathers, the rise of the Evangelical movement and of Pentecostalism, and the recent crises within the Catholic Church. Bursting with original insights and a great pleasure to read, this monumental religious history will not soon be surpassed.

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Praise for Christianity

“Immensely ambitious and absorbing.”
—Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker

“A landmark contribution . . . It is difficult to imagine a more comprehensive and surprisingly accessible volume than MacCulloch’s.”
—Jon Meacham, The New York Times Book Review

“A prodigious, thrilling, masterclass of a history book. MacCulloch is to be congratulated for his accessible handling of so much complex, difficult material.”
—John Cornwell, Financial Times

“A tour de force: it has enormous range, is gracefully and wittily written, and from page one holds the attention. Everyone who reads it will learn things they didn’t know.”
—Eamon Duffy, author of Saints and Sinners

“MacCulloch brings an insider’s wit to tracing the fate of official Christianity in an age of doubt, and to addressing modern surges of zeal, from Mormons to Pentecostals.”
—The Economist

“A triumphantly executed achievement. This book is a landmark in its field, astonishing in its range, compulsively readable, full of insight even for the most jaded professional and of illumination for the interested general reader. It will have few, if any, rivals in the English language.”
—Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury

“A well-informed and—bless the man—witty narrative guaranteed to please and at the same time displease every single reader, if hardly in identical measure. . . . The author’s prose style is fluent, well-judged, and wholly free of cant. . . . You will shut this large book with gratitude for a long and stimulating journey.”
—The Washington Times

“A tour de force . . . The great strength of the book is that it covers, in sufficient but not oppressive detail, huge areas of Christian history which are dealt with cursorily in traditional accounts of the subject and are unfamiliar to most English-speaking readers. . . . MacCulloch’s analysis of why Christianity has taken root in Korea but made such a hash in India is perceptive and his account of the nineteenth-century missions in Africa and the Pacific is first-rate and full of insight. . . . The most brilliant point of this remarkable book is its identification of the U.S. as the prime example of the kind of nation the reformers hoped to create.”
—Paul Johnson, The Spectator

About the Author

Diarmaid MacCulloch is a fellow of St. Cross College, Oxford, and professor of the history of the church at Oxford University. His books include  Suffolk and the Tudors, winner of the Royal Historical Society’s Whitfield Prize, and  Thomas Cranmer: A Life, which won the Whitbread Biography Prize, the James Tait Black Prize, and the Duff Cooper Prize. A former Anglican deacon, he has presented many highly celebrated documentaries for television and radio, and was knighted in 2012 for his services to scholarship. He lives in Oxford, England.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Clement B. Edgar III
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A lot of history: mainstream and dense, this book is not for everyone
Reviewed in the United States on June 4, 2018
MacCulloch''s very detailed Christianity starts a thousand years before Christ with the Greek and Jewish foundations that formed the world''s biggest religion. MacCulloch describes himself as a "a candid friend of Christianity" (p. 10), and perhaps some will find his... See more
MacCulloch''s very detailed Christianity starts a thousand years before Christ with the Greek and Jewish foundations that formed the world''s biggest religion. MacCulloch describes himself as a "a candid friend of Christianity" (p. 10), and perhaps some will find his viewpoint more objective than that of a devoted believer. I am less enthusiastic. But I am glad I read the book.

To the extent that I am qualified to comment, I find his views in line with mainstream Christian scholarship. Since I have difficulty with what I will uncharitably call the biblical revisionism that forms the foundation for much of the modern understanding of ancient Judaism, Christianity, and the Bible, at least in mainstream liberal critical circles, I found his exposition of Jewish and Christian history, through the second century, disappointing but unsurprising. I look forward to the day when scholars come to terms with the fact that, if they reject the more speculative aspects of nineteenth and early twentieth century biblical revisionism, they must also reject the more recent extrapolations of the earlier conclusions. My viewpoints are much more inline with those of Bruce, Carson, Kitchen, Longman, and Robinson.*

After introducing himself, MacCulloch starts his book with a discussion of ancient Greek history and philosophy, and its influence on Christian belief and theology. I found this very helpful. MacCulloch explained how Greek culture influenced Jewish culture throughout the Roman empire. He discussed how Greek notions of the perfection of God clashed with the more personal, passionate, and earthy Jewish God of the Bible. He pointed out how that for Greeks, the God of the Old Testament was the almost the antithesis of their ideas of God. Included in the discussion was Diogenes, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and Pythagoras. MacCulloch later shows how these philosophers influenced both mainstream and heretical Christian belief throughout Christian history.

MacCulloch is really quite ambitious to try to teach all of Christian history, in all the world, from before Christ to now. This is not just a broad brush summary of Christian history: there is depth and detail, in my opinion, too much detail. In any given century, there seem to be about a half a dozen major heresies, at least two or three mainstream accepted theologies, a number of important Christian leaders, several major wars, one or more genocides, a new expectation of the end of the world, a few major missionary efforts, one or several large political shifts, a new understanding of what it means to be Christian, and the relentless expansion of the Christian church. There is a lot of information here, and I would like to assimilate it better, but for me, I am overwhelmed.

I like MacCulloch''s story telling style. It is enjoyable and informative and very readable. But I had trouble absorbing key points. As MacCulloch points out, many Christian leaders and theologies continue to impact the faith for centuries after their inception. When a student first encounters these leaders and theologies, it is not obvious which ones will become important. As I am reading about them, I don''t know what to focus on. Without knowing history, I don''t know how to read history! A little help from the teacher in this instance would be appreciated.

As an example, MacCulloch describes Martin Luther''s theology in the context of his life, including his upbringing, rivalries, influences, politics, and travel. We then learn the stories of Luther''s followers. Eventually great changes are triggered by Luther''s writing, several large protestant denominations develop, even the course of nations is changed, and each development has a history of its own. MacCulloch expounds seemingly on each development of theology, ritual, art, politics, and culture, decade by decade, throughout Europe, and then beyond. In the midst of all this information, I become lost. What was it that Luther was trying to say? The problem with history is there is just too much of it!

In spite of my complaints, I am glad I read the book. It has made me aware of the size and diversity of Christianity. I have learned a little about tolerance, and especially intolerance. I have learned about the quest for power, influence, and control in human institutions, churches, and nations, and especially the horror that can result. And I have learned a little about belief, faith, hope, and spirit; I think I have especially learned that humility is key to love and understanding, for each other and our creator. Overall, I liked the book, not a lot, but I liked it. I may read it again, and if I do, I will take better notes. I hesitantly recommend it.

--------------------
* That is I more closely embrace the viewpoints expressed in the following books:
- Bruce, F. F. The New Testament documents : are they reliable. Grand Rapids, Mich. Downers Grove, Ill: Eerdmans InterVarsity Press, 2003.
- Carson, D. A., and Douglas J. Moo. An introduction to the New Testament. Grand Rapids, Mich: Zondervan, 2009.
- Kitchen, K. A. On the reliability of the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, Mich: W.B. Eerdmans, 2006.
- Longman, Tremper, and Raymond B. Dillard. An introduction to the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, Mich: Zondervan, 2006.
- Robinson, John A. Redating the New Testament. London: S.C.M. Press, 1976.

Note: Rated three out of five stars on Goodreads, as Goodreads defines three stars as "I like it" and two stars as "It''s okay".
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TMichaelO
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Fool’s Errand
Reviewed in the United States on October 12, 2020
I was hoping to find a reliable history of the Christian church and especially the Hellenistic influence on church doctrine. The fact that it started exactly where it should, in both Ancient Greece and Israel was a plus. That it got such accolades from elitists was a... See more
I was hoping to find a reliable history of the Christian church and especially the Hellenistic influence on church doctrine. The fact that it started exactly where it should, in both Ancient Greece and Israel was a plus. That it got such accolades from elitists was a concern, but I am always eager to read people with different perspectives as I always learn from them even if I disagree with their particular “theology.” No one, especially historians, are unbiased. But MacCulloch’s superficial understanding and misrepresentation of events that any adolescent could read and easily understand for themselves, such as the story of King Saul and David, makes me skeptical that his judgment about the Gospels and the rest of the church’s history is anything one can rely on. Such a gargantuan undertaking requires a level of humility that MacCulloch does not know exists. I have not finished reading it, and will give an update when I do, but for someone looking for a serious, unbiased history that shows an understanding of both the larger story and the specifics, should look elsewhere. His style is engaging if not arrogant at times, but I care much more about thoughtful insights. Hopefully I will encounter a morsel or two of wisdom to make the rest of the read worthwhile. If I do I will humbly acknowledge it.
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Spike
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A sterling presentation of Christianity from a historian''s perspective.
Reviewed in the United States on April 22, 2017
While this book could be used as an entry level text in college or seminary (I''ve taught both), it''s really aimed at a general audience. While the author presumes little (other than an acceptance that the evidences of history, archeology and logic should have meaning for... See more
While this book could be used as an entry level text in college or seminary (I''ve taught both), it''s really aimed at a general audience. While the author presumes little (other than an acceptance that the evidences of history, archeology and logic should have meaning for readers of the Bible and theology), and does not make assumptions concerning the faith of its readers, it does come from a perspective faith seeking understanding, and the embedded presumption that Christianity can and should have meaning in people''s lives. With this said, I found it to be a well informed theological and historical exploration of the first 3000 years of Christianity. The opening chapters, being a whirlwind of Biblical criticism and Greek and Latin history move along very briskly. Sometimes bits of detail are missing, but not often.
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Dennis A. Tosh
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Superb overview of Christian history
Reviewed in the United States on January 23, 2019
I write this review from the perspective of a person who believes in a personal God, the deity of Christ, and his death and resurrection as a propitiation for sin -- substitutionally atonement. I dislike labels, but the term "Evangelical" is likely the one with the best... See more
I write this review from the perspective of a person who believes in a personal God, the deity of Christ, and his death and resurrection as a propitiation for sin -- substitutionally atonement. I dislike labels, but the term "Evangelical" is likely the one with the best fit. This book needs to be read through a particular lens. Dr. Mccullough, although an ardent believer in his youth, is quite cagy about his present beliefs and after watching a number of his lectures I doubt he is even a deist. That doesn''t make his scholarship bad. He characterizes himself as a "friend of Christianity" and I will take that at face value.

He does a great job in synthesizing vast amounts of history of the Christian faith and making it, although not easy for the sluggardly of mind, extraordinarily approachable for anyone willing to bugger on with the effort. I contrast his work with that of Schaff which, although more sympathetic to my point of view, is so detailed as to be almost unapproachable. I highly recommend the book to anyone wanting to better understand the history of the faith, which I regard as extraordinarily important.

Back to the lens. Dr. Maccullouch'' scholarship as a historian is more compelling than his scholarship as a theologian. Where he sees accidents of history, I see (through my lens) God''s provincial hand. Where he sees, with historical merit, much messiness in the growth of the faith and acts of much evil, I see (through my lens) a distinction between the essential messages of Christianity and how man, in his fallen nature, and often betrayed those central messages, much to his (generic) shame.

This book is a masterpiece of history, if not of theology. I am very glad I took the (considerable!) time to read it.
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Nancy C.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Long but very informative
Reviewed in the United States on August 6, 2017
This book is over 1,000 pages long (excluding notes and index). Reading it is more like a way of life or a devotion than reading a normal book. I''ve been at it for months already, reading a little each day, and I''m determined to finish it -- because if I do, I will have... See more
This book is over 1,000 pages long (excluding notes and index). Reading it is more like a way of life or a devotion than reading a normal book. I''ve been at it for months already, reading a little each day, and I''m determined to finish it -- because if I do, I will have learned the entire history of Christianity, all 3,000 years of it! It is a long and crazy history, but reading this book will give you a basis for being much more informed about Christianity''s long and varied history, which has affected so much in our world. There are aspects of Christianity I simply had never heard anything about before -- for example, the Armenian church, the Orthodox church, Christianity in Africa, etc. It is very well written and dense but not difficult writing. I also watched the 6 part DVD that accompanies this. You can see Diarmaid MacCulloch''s passion for the subject, which comes through in every page. He is a truly passionate scholar.
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Chad Helms
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great but a couple of caveats
Reviewed in the United States on February 9, 2014
There''s no doubt that MacCulloch is a great scholar of Church History and has, rightly, acquired an international reputation in his field. This work is, therefore, what one would expect from such a renowned scholar: a work of much erudition and intellectual reflection. I... See more
There''s no doubt that MacCulloch is a great scholar of Church History and has, rightly, acquired an international reputation in his field. This work is, therefore, what one would expect from such a renowned scholar: a work of much erudition and intellectual reflection. I would normally give it a five star review except for two caveats. The first problem with the book, in my humble opinion, is that it is ostensibly directed at the average layman and intended to introduce the average reading public with the history of the Christian Church. The problem therein lies in one of the beauties of the work: it is so erudite. As a church buddy of mine commented on reading the book, "He mentions things he obviously expects me to know but he hasn''t given me any explanation or background." I feel this is a correct assessment of the book. If you dive into it without any previous study of Church history it will be confusing at times. The second issue I have with MacCulloch is a more personal one (although I certainly don''t mean this to be an ad hominem attack on a scholar I greatly admire). He has a distressing tendency to present personal opinion (or- shall we say- minority academic opinion) with fact agreed upon by the consensus of scholars. Just a couple examples, MacCulloch opines that Jesus spoke mediocre "market-place" Greek. He says this as a fact that is indisputable. Actually, of course, no one knows what type of Greek Jesus spoke- if any at all. Some scholars believe that Jesus'' Greek was fluent; others have maintained that he spoke no Greek at all. But you would never know there was any disagreement on this issue from MacCulloch who- as I say- presents his own opinion as fact. Another example is his interesting and rather long discussion of the meaning of the Greek "epiousios" in the Lord''s Prayer. He flatly states that the word relates to future events and connects it with Jesus'' proclamation of the imminent end of the world and his parousia. However, there is absolutely no consensus in the academic community that this is what the word "epiousios" (usually translated "daily'' as in "daily bread") means. Many scholars believe it means what it is normally translated to mean: i.e., "daily". Other scholars frankly admit that the word is enigmatic and let their readers know that there is no definitive academic position on its meaning. MacCulloch, however, in his typical fashion presents his theory (which may, of course, be the correct one) and doesn''t let his reader have the benefit of knowing that this is a debated point among scholars
So, long story short, I think this is overall a great work of Church history that every serious student should probably read. Even if you disagree with MacCulloch, which I often find myself doing, he provokes thought and that is always a good thing. If you decide to read Christianity: the First Three Thousand Years just do yourself a favor and read a shorter, simpler introduction to Christianity first and, then, as you are reading the work always keep in mind that some of his assertions may be more personal opinion than scholarly consensus. With these two caveats in mind, I think any reader will enjoy the book and find it a gold mine of information.
144 people found this helpful
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Cara Ellen Modisett
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Outstanding research
Reviewed in the United States on August 20, 2018
We use this book as part of the third-year curriculum in Education for Ministry (a program designed by the Episcopal seminary at Sewanee). It''s a dense book (every paragraph could be its own book!), incredibly well researched and told with a subtle sense of humor, as well.... See more
We use this book as part of the third-year curriculum in Education for Ministry (a program designed by the Episcopal seminary at Sewanee). It''s a dense book (every paragraph could be its own book!), incredibly well researched and told with a subtle sense of humor, as well. Recommended reading for anyone who is exploring the Christian faith from the outside or from the inside (the author himself is an agnostic, and the son of a Church of England priest); especially recommended for those who take a literalist view of the Bible - yes, it is a sacred book, but influenced by historical and social contexts, politics and mores and agendas not our own. The reader comes away with a greater sense of the scope and significance of the Christian religion, its imperfections, abuses and inspirations, its roots in Judaism and its relationship to other world religions.
8 people found this helpful
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Mitch Brockelbank
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The author needs FOCUS!
Reviewed in the United States on August 24, 2018
I consider myself a student of the Bible, and was eager to listen to this audiobook. I have not been able to get past the introduction. The introduction to this audio book was so utterly confusing, with myriad oblique references to other works written by the same author, or... See more
I consider myself a student of the Bible, and was eager to listen to this audiobook. I have not been able to get past the introduction. The introduction to this audio book was so utterly confusing, with myriad oblique references to other works written by the same author, or recently read by him, but completely unknown by me, that I have been unable to make any sense of where he intended to take his audience. His discourse may make sense if he is speaking directly to his thesis advisor but is a black box to everyone else. I felt like I was eavesdropping on a conversation instead of listening to an audiobook I paid for.
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Top reviews from other countries

Mony Vibescu
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Remarkable scholarship raises huge range of questions about the whole course of human history
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 11, 2018
This is a work of remarkable scholarship and erudition, staggeringly comprehensive & packed with more characters, ideas, isms and schisms than anyone could possibly remember. What it doesn''t do is discuss the emotional and spiritual benefits which religious people...See more
This is a work of remarkable scholarship and erudition, staggeringly comprehensive & packed with more characters, ideas, isms and schisms than anyone could possibly remember. What it doesn''t do is discuss the emotional and spiritual benefits which religious people presumably get from their faith. It is very much a bureaucratic history of the organisational and power structures of Christianity over the millennia, and that focus brings a number of issues to the fore: (i) The extent to which a religion''s spread is dependent on the support of militarily and economically successful temporal power (ii) The sheer scale of the time and manpower devoted to attempting to impose uniformity of thought on a range of issues which by their very nature are unknowable (iii) The extent to which core Christian beliefs and practices were developed long after Christ''s lifetime in response to changing geographical and historical circumstances (iv) The remarkable triviality of many of the issues over which Christians have been ready to hate, fight and kill one another (Is Christ one personality in two forms or two personalities, one human and one divine? Does the Holy Spirit "proceed" from God and Christ or from God alone? Is there a Trinity and if so what is the pecking order within it? Is Mary the mother of the world? Should the host be elevated?...) (v) The strangeness of many of the concepts at the heart of the Christian message - "sin", "grace", "salvation" and particularly the weird obsession, which seems to be one of the constant themes of the history as MacCulloch tells it, with the "end days" and the apocalyspe/rapture which so many people appear to have been imminently anticipating and hoping for since the time of Jesus. Watching the history unfold over more than 1,000 pages, the reader wonders whether to admire Christianity as a structure for preserving scholarship and knowledge and civility through centuries of turmoil and strife, or to look on horrified at the waste of so much time and effort and resource on arguing over unanswerable questions. The way MacCulloch tells it, it almost seems that mankind was offered a choice 2,000 years ago between the approaches of Aristotle, based on learning from observation of the reality of the material world, and Jesus, based on assumptions about the nature of an unobservable and notional immaterial world, and went off down a gigantic centuries-long blind alley. Not that MacCulloch is banging the atheist drum - he doesn''t take sides, and it''s difficult to tell from this book what his beliefs might be, but there is a definite sense of indulgence towards those motivated by faith, whether they are baptising slaves as they are taken off the ships or deciding not to burn so many witches or finding "good scriptural reasons" for suppressing Galileo''s knowledge, compared to a rather snide tone towards the personal failings of the Enlightenment philosophers. However, there is an awful lot in this book to bolster any atheist in his or her beliefs. It becomes very amusing, as the history moves into the period of growing secularisation, human rights and scientific understanding, quite how often MacCulloch notes that developments offered "an opportunity for humility" for churches.
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C.Theodorou
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Islamic Apologist
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 12, 2018
The lack of knowledge in regards to the section of the book covering Islam is truly stunning. For a scholar to lack such basic knowledge and to act an as Islamic apologist for the rise of the Islamic caliphate and the death of 200 million people and to merely brush it off...See more
The lack of knowledge in regards to the section of the book covering Islam is truly stunning. For a scholar to lack such basic knowledge and to act an as Islamic apologist for the rise of the Islamic caliphate and the death of 200 million people and to merely brush it off as excess is truly remarkable. Muhammad is called "The Prophet" which for a scholar to do who is claiming to be a neutral historian is remarkable as nowhere else in the book for example is Jesus The Christ called The Messiah. And then to make the astonishing claim that Muslim conquerors did little to explain their faith to their new subjects or to convert them to it. For almost 1400 years Islam has forcibly converted non Muslims to Islam especially children. Anybody seeking further proof of this should study closely the brutal Islamic conquest of India. These are just afew examples of the Isamic apologist attitude of the author so please read with caution.
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Tony Strawson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing History Of Christianity
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 26, 2018
If you wish to read a detailed account on the history of Christianity then this book is ideal. The author has structured this book in such a fantastic way that it makes a really absorbing read. As a student of the Christian theology, I was extremely impressed by the layout...See more
If you wish to read a detailed account on the history of Christianity then this book is ideal. The author has structured this book in such a fantastic way that it makes a really absorbing read. As a student of the Christian theology, I was extremely impressed by the layout of all the material contained inside this book and I found it very simple to follow. The attention to detail was clearly evident as each historical period was covered; presented accurately in such a wonderful easy-to-read format.
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Guy Blythman
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The History Of Christianity
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 31, 2020
This is a monumental, and undoubtedly very well-written and absorbing, work. I was apprehensive about reading it at first given that it was written by someone who although the son of a Christian priest is not actually a believer; perhaps only one who is can truly understand...See more
This is a monumental, and undoubtedly very well-written and absorbing, work. I was apprehensive about reading it at first given that it was written by someone who although the son of a Christian priest is not actually a believer; perhaps only one who is can truly understand the faith and so present it fairly. Nonetheless, it''s useful to have an analysis from a person who isn''t entirely an insider. The important thing for both believers and nonbelievers to understand is that it''s fair-minded. It''s a warts-and-all study which quite rightly does not seek to gloss over the fact that Christians have not always lived up to their professed principles, their message of love and peace for all. It also however makes clear that the faith has included many people of genuine compassion and humanity, as well as been responsible for so much in the way of art, literature and music, along with the atrocities (these days, where the latter is concerned, it''s generally the Christians who are the victims). Because it covers such a huge scope of space and time there''s inevitably a lot that it misses out; in particular it doesn''t quite capture the anguish of many Christians in Western Europe at declining church membership and the sense of being under attack by militant atheists whose attitude can be very nasty, or the fact that despite the way in which it''s vilified by some it''s actually evolved over the past century from a monolithic and arguably oppressive institution to something like an agency for benign social work! My main gripe is that although the author criticises those who "sneer at political correctness" his insistence on referring to people and places in the original vernacular (it would seem we are expected to say "Inka" not "Inca" and "Fernando and Isabel" rather than "Ferdinand and Isabella" when referring to the twin rulers of late fifteenth-century Spain) goes beyond what is necessary and is genuinely irritating (the word I would use is pedantic). But this shouldn''t be allowed to detract from the book''s overall value.
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Jeffrey G. Walters
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An outstanding study
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 19, 2016
It doesn''t matter whether you have a faith or not, if you want a better understanding of factors influencing these belief systems, then this is the book for you. I was woefully ignorant about the emergence and development of faith before reading this. The author does not...See more
It doesn''t matter whether you have a faith or not, if you want a better understanding of factors influencing these belief systems, then this is the book for you. I was woefully ignorant about the emergence and development of faith before reading this. The author does not set out to prove or disprove the case for faith, but represents the facts as we know them. As an atheist, I found the book fascinating and wanted a better understanding about how and why faith occurs. There is no doubt, that it has helped me to clarify my own position on this most fundamental of subjects. To have written this book , is a monumental achievement and I cannot recommend it highly enough.
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Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

Christianity: The outlet sale First lowest Three Thousand Years online sale

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