My high quality Ishmael (Ishmael discount Series) sale

My high quality Ishmael (Ishmael discount Series) sale

My high quality Ishmael (Ishmael discount Series) sale
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Description

Product Description

An extraordinary and startlingly original sequel to Ishmael 
 
“Enthralling, shocking, hope-filled, and utterly fearless, Daniel Quinn leads us deeper and deeper into the human heart, history, and spirit. In My Ishmael, Quinn strikes out into entirely new territory, posing questions that will rock you on your heels, and providing tantalizing possibilities for a truly new world vision.”—Susan Chernak McElroy, author of Animals as Teachers & Healers

When Ishmael places an advertisement for pupils with “an earnest desire to save the world,” he does not expect a child to answer him.  But twelve-year-old Julie Gerchak is undaunted by Ishmael’s reluctance to teach someone so young, and convinces him to take her on as his next student.  Ishmael knows he can''t apply the same strategies with Julie that he used with his first pupil, Alan Lomax—nor can he hope for the same outcome. But young Julie proves that she is ready to forge her own spiritual path and arrive at her own destination.  And when the time comes to choose a pupil to carry out his greatest mission yet, Ishmael makes a daring decision—a choice that just might change the world.
 
Explore Daniel Quinn’s spiritual Ishmael trilogy: 
ISHMAEL • MY ISHMAEL • THE STORY OF B

Review

"Enthralling, shocking, hope-filled, and utterly fearless, Quinn leads us deeper and deeper into the human heart, history, and spirit.  Thank God the gorilla is back! In My Ishmael, Quinn strikes out into entirely new territory, posing questions that will rock you on your heels, and providing tantalizing possibilities for a truly new world vision."
--Susan Chernak McElroy, author of Animals as Teachers & Healers

"Irresistible...[Quinn''s] ideas are as thought-provoking as ever."
--Kirkus Reviews

From the Inside Flap

Winner of the Turner Tomorrow Fellowship, Daniel Quinn''s Ishmael is a bestseller and a testament for a burgeoning spiritual movement.  Now Quinn presents an extraordinary sequel, a companion novel so startlingly original that even Ishmael''s most faithful readers will not predict its outcome....

When Ishmael places an advertisement for pupils with "an earnest desire to save the world," he does not expect a child to answer him.  But twelve-year-old Julie Gerchak is undaunted by Ishmael''s reluctance to teach someone so young, and convinces him to take her on as his next student.  Ishmael knows he can''t apply the same strategies with Julie that he used with his first pupil, Alan Lomax--nor can he hope for the same outcome.  But young Julie proves that she is ready to forge her own spiritual path--and arrive at her own destination.  And when the time comes to choose a pupil to carry out his greatest mission yet, Ishmael makes a daring decision--a choice that just might change the world.

From the Back Cover

Winner of the Turner Tomorrow Fellowship, Daniel Quinn''s Ishmael is a bestseller and a testament for a burgeoning spiritual movement. Now Quinn presents an extraordinary sequel, a companion novel so startlingly original that even Ishmael''s most faithful readers will not predict its outcome....
When Ishmael places an advertisement for pupils with "an earnest desire to save the world," he does not expect a child to answer him. But twelve-year-old Julie Gerchak is undaunted by Ishmael''s reluctance to teach someone so young, and convinces him to take her on as his next student. Ishmael knows he can''t apply the same strategies with Julie that he used with his first pupil, Alan Lomax--nor can he hope for the same outcome. But young Julie proves that she is ready to forge her own spiritual path--and arrive at her own destination. And when the time comes to choose a pupil to carry out his greatest mission yet, Ishmael makes a daring decision--a choice that just might change the world.

About the Author

Daniel Quinn grew up in Omaha, Nebraska, and studied at St. Louis University, the University of Vienna, and Loyola University of Chicago. He worked in Chicago-area publishing for twenty years before beginning work on the book for which he is best known,  Ishmael. In 1991, this book was chosen from among some 2,500 international entrants in the Turner Tomorrow competition to win the half-million dollar prize for a novel offering “creative and positive solutions to global problems.” It has subsequently sold more than a million copies in English, is available in some thirty languages, and has been used in high schools and colleges worldwide in courses as varied as philosophy, geography, ecology, archaeology, history, biology, zoology, anthropology, political science, economics, and sociology. Subsequent works include  Providence, The Story of B, My Ishmael: A Sequel, Beyond Civilization, After Dachau, The Holy, At Woomeroo, The Invisibility of Success, and The Teachings. Daniel Quinn died in 2018.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

There was a second chair in place when I arrived on Friday, and I didn''t like it one bit--not the chair itself, of course, but rather the very idea of sharing my Ishmael with anyone, selfish minx that I am.  But at least it was not as nice as the friendly old broken-down one I was used to.  I pretended it wasn''t there, and we got started.

"Among her friends in college," Ishmael began, "my benefactor, Rachel Sokolow, counted a young man named Jeffrey, whose father was an affluent surgeon.  Jeffrey became an important person in many lives at this time and later, because he presented people with a problem.  He couldn''t figure out what to do with himself.  He was physically attractive, intelligent, personable, and talented at almost anything he turned his hand to.  He could play the guitar well, though he had no interest in a musical career.  He could take a good photograph, produce a good sketch, play the lead in a school play, and write an entertaining story or a provocative essay, but he didn''t want to be a photographer, an artist, an actor, or a writer.  He did well in all his classes but didn''t want to be a teacher or a scholar and wasn''t interested in following his father''s footsteps or in pursuing a career in law, the sciences, mathematics, business, or politics.  He was drawn to things of the spirit and was an occasional churchgoer but didn''t care to become a theologian or a clergyman.  In spite of all this, he seemed "well-adjusted,'' as it''s called.  He wasn''t notably phobic or depressive or neurotic.  He wasn''t doubtful or confused about his sexual orientation.  He figured he''d settle down and marry one day, but not until he''d found some purpose in life.

"Jeffrey''s friends never tired of finding new ideas to present to him in hopes of awakening his interest.  Wouldn''t he enjoy reviewing films for the local newspaper?  Had he ever thought of taking up scrimshaw or jewelry making?  Cabinetry was put forward as a soul-satisfying occupation.  How about fossil hunting?  Gourmet cooking?  Maybe he should get into Scouting.  Or wouldn''t it be fun to go on an archaeological dig?  Jeffrey''s father was completely sympathetic with his inability to discover an enthusiasm and ready to support him in whatever exploration he might find worthwhile.  If a world tour had any appeal, a travel agent would be put to work on it.  If he wanted to try the life of an outdoorsman, equipment would be supplied, gladly.  If he wanted to take to the sea, a boat would be made ready.  If he wanted to try his hand at pottery, he''d have a kiln waiting for him.  Even if he just wanted to be a social butterfly, that would be fine.  He shrugged it all off, politely, embarrassed to be putting everyone to so much trouble.

"I don''t want to give you the impression he was lazy or spoiled.  He was always at the top of his class, always held a part-time job, lived in ordinary student housing, didn''t own a car.  He just looked at the world that was on offer to him and couldn''t see a single thing in it worth having.  His friends kept saying to him, "Look, you can''t go on this way.  You''ve got too much going for you.  You''ve just got to get some ambition, got to find something you want to do with your life!''

"Jeffrey graduated with honors but without a direction.  After hanging around his father''s house for the summer, he went to visit some college friends who had just gotten married.  He took along his knapsack, his guitar, his journal.  After a few weeks he set out to visit some other friends, hitchhiking.  He was in no hurry.  He stopped along the way, helped some people who were building a barn, earned enough money to keep going, and eventually reached his next destination.  Soon it was getting on for winter and he headed home.  He and his father had long conversations, played gin rummy, played pool, played tennis, watched football, drank beer, read books, went to movies.

"When spring came, Jeffrey bought a secondhand car and set out to visit friends in the other direction.  People took him in wherever he went.  They liked him and felt sorry for him, he was so rootless, so ineffectual, so unfocused.  But they didn''t give up on him.  One person wanted to buy him a video camera so he could make a film of his wanderings.  Jeffrey wasn''t interested.  Another person volunteered to send his poetry around to magazines to see if anyone would publish it.  Jeffrey said that was fine, but personally, he didn''t care one way or the other.  After working at a boys'' camp for the summer, he was asked to stay on as a permanent member of the staff, but it didn''t appeal to him that much.

"When winter came, his father talked him into seeing a psychotherapist he knew and trusted.  Jeffrey stuck with it throughout the winter, going three times a week, but in the end the therapist had to admit that, apart from being "a little immature,'' there was nothing whatever wrong with him.  Asked what "a little immature'' meant, the therapist said Jeffrey was unmotivated, unfocused, and lacked goals--everything they already knew.  "He''ll find something in a year or two,'' the therapist predicted.  "And it''ll probably be something very obvious.  I''m sure it''s staring him in the face right now, and he just doesn''t see it.''  When spring came, Jeffrey went back out on the road, and if something was staring him in the face, he went on being unable to see it.

"The years drifted by in this way.  Jeffrey watched old friends get married, raise children, build careers, build businesses, win a little fame here, a little fortune there . . . while he went on playing his guitar, writing a poem now and then, and filling one journal after another.  Just last spring he celebrated his thirty-first birthday with friends at a vacation cottage on a lake in Wisconsin.  In the morning he walked down to the water, wrote a few lines in his journal, then waded into the lake and drowned himself."

"Sad," I said after a moment, unable to think of anything more brilliant.

"It''s a commonplace story, Julie, except for one fact--the fact that Jeffrey''s father made it possible for him to drift, actually supported him while he did nothing for nearly ten years--put no pressure on him to shape up and become a responsible adult.  That''s what made Jeffrey different from millions of other young people in your culture who in fact have no more motivation than he did.  Or do you think I''m mistaken in this?"

"I don''t understand you well enough to say whether you''re mistaken."

"Thinking of the young people you know, do you find them burning to be out there becoming lawyers and bankers and engineers and cooks and hairstylists and insurance agents and bus drivers?"

"Some of them, yeah.  Not especially to be the things you mentioned, hairstylists and bus drivers, but some things.  I know kids who wouldn''t mind being movie stars and professional athletes, for example."

"And what are their chances of becoming these things, realistically speaking?"

"Millions to one, I suppose."

"Do you think there are eighteen-year-olds out there dreaming of becoming cabdrivers or dental technicians or asphalt spreaders?"

"No."

"Do you think there are a lot of eighteen-year-olds out there who are like Jeffrey, who are not really attracted to anything in the Taker world of work?  Who would be glad to skip it entirely if someone gave them an annual stipend of twenty or thirty thousand dollars?"

"God yes, if you put it like that, I''m sure there are.  Are you kidding?  Millions of them."

"But if there isn''t anything they really want to do in the Taker world of work, why do they enter it at all?  Why do they take jobs that are clearly not meaningful to them or to anyone else?"

"They take them because they have to.  Their parents throw them out of the house.  They either get jobs or starve."

"That''s right.  But of course in every graduating class there are a few who would just as soon starve.  People used to call them tramps or bums or hobos.  Nowadays they often characterize themselves as "homeless,'' suggesting that they live on the street because they''re forced to, not because they prefer to.  They''re runaways, beachcombers, ad hoc hookers and hustlers, muggers, bag ladies, and Dumpster divers.  They scrounge a living one way or another.  The food may be under lock and key, but they''ve found all the cracks in the strongroom wall.  They roll drunks and collect aluminum cans.  They panhandle, haunt restaurant garbage cans, and practice petty thievery.  It isn''t an easy life, but they''d rather live this way than get a meaningless job and live like the mass of urban poor.  This is actually a very large subculture, Julie."

"Yeah, I recognize it now that you put it this way.  I actually know kids who talk about wanting to go live on the street.  They talk about going to specific cities where there are already a lot of kids doing it.  I think Seattle is one."

"This phenomenon shades off into the phenomena of juvenile gangs and cults.  When these street urchins are organized around charismatic warlords, they''re perceived as gangs.  When they''re organized around charismatic gurus, they''re perceived as cults.  Children living on the street have a very low life expectancy, and it doesn''t take them long to realize that.  They see their friends die in their teens or early twenties, and they know their fate is going to be the same.  Even so, they can''t bring themselves to rent some hovel, collect some decent clothes, and try to get some stupid minimum-wage job they hate.  Do you see what I''m saying, Julie?  Jeffrey is just the upper-class representative of the phenomenon.  The lower-class representatives don''t have the privilege of drowning themselves in nice clean lakes in Wisconsin, but what they''re doing comes to the same thing.  They''d as soon be dead as join the ranks of ordinary urban paupers, and they generally are soon dead."

"I see all that," I told him.  "What I don''t see yet is the point you''re making."

"I haven''t really made a point yet, Julie.  I''m drawing your attention to something the people of your culture want to pretend is of no importance, is irrelevant.  The story of Jeffrey is terribly sad--but he''s a rarity, isn''t he?  You might be concerned if there were thousands of Jeffreys walking into lakes.  But young riffraff dying on your streets by the thousands is something you can safely ignore."

"Yes, that''s true."

"What I''m looking at is something the people of your culture feel sure doesn''t need to be looked at.  These are drug addicts, losers, gangsters, trash.  The adult attitude toward them is, "If they want to live like animals, let them live like animals.  If they want to kill themselves off, let them kill themselves off.  They''re defectives, sociopaths, and misfits, and we''re well rid of them."''

"Yeah, I''d say that''s how most grown-ups feel about it."

"They''re in a state of denial, Julie, and what is it they''re denying?"

"They''re denying that these are their children.  These are somebody else''s children."

"That''s right.  There is no message for you in a Jeffrey drowning himself in the lake or a Susie dying of an overdose in the gutter.  There''s no message for you in the tens of thousands who kill themselves annually, who disappear into the streets, leaving behind nothing but faces on milk cartons.  This is no message.  This is like static on the radio, something to be ignored, and the more you ignore it, the better the music sounds."

"Very true.  But I''m still groping for your point."

"No one would think of asking themselves, "What do these children need?"''

"God no.  Who cares what they need?"

"But you can ask yourself that, can''t you?  Can you bring yourself to it, Julie?  Can you bear it?"

I sat there for a minute, staring at nothing, and suddenly the goddamnedest thing happened: I burst into tears.  I exploded into tears.  I sat there completely overwhelmed in great, huge racking sobs that wouldn''t go away, wouldn''t go away, until I began to think I''d found my life''s work, to sit in that chair and sob.

When I began to settle down, I stood up, told Ishmael I''d be back in a while, and went out for a walk around the block--around a couple blocks, in fact.

Then I went back and told him I didn''t know how to put it into words.

"You can''t put the emotions into words, Julie.  I know that.  You put those into sobs, and there are no words equivalent to that.  But there are other things you can put into words."

"Yeah, I suppose that''s true."

"You had some sort of vision of the devastating loss you share with the young people we''ve been talking about."

"Yeah.  I didn''t know I shared it with them.  I didn''t know I shared anything with them."

"The first day you visited me, you said you''re constantly telling yourself, "I''ve got to get out of here, I''ve got to get out of here.'' You said this meant "Run for your life!"''

"Yeah.  I guess you could say that''s what I was feeling as I sat here crying.   Please!  Please let me run for my life!  Please let me out of here!  Please, let me go!  Please don''t keep me penned up here for the rest of my life!  I''ve GOTTA run!  I can''t STAND this!"

"But these aren''t thoughts you can share with your classmates."

"These aren''t thoughts I could have shared with myself two weeks ago."

"You wouldn''t have dared to look at them."

"No, if I''d looked at them, I would''ve said, "My God, what''s wrong with me?  I must have a disease of some kind!"''

"These are exactly the kinds of thoughts that Jeffrey wrote in his journal again and again.  "What''s wrong with me?  What''s wrong with me?  There must be something terribly wrong with me that I''m unable to find joy in the world of work.'' Always he wrote, "What''s wrong with me, what''s wrong with me, what''s wrong with me?'' And of course all his friends were forever saying to him, "What''s wrong with you, what''s wrong with you, what''s wrong with you that you can''t get with this wonderful program?'' Perhaps you understand for the first time now that my role here is to bring you this tremendous news, that there''s nothing wrong here with YOU. You are not what''s wrong.  And I think there was an element of this understanding in your sobs: "My God, it isn''t me!"''

"Yes, you''re right.  Half of what I was feeling was a tremendous sense of relief."

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
429 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Joey Kahn
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Beautiful Re-Telling of the Original
Reviewed in the United States on July 27, 2020
What''s important to know before going into this sequel, (assuming that you''ve read Ishmael already; aka the first book), is that My Ishmael''s aim is to re-tell the original lessons under a different context. This book''s intention is to reach out to readers that didn''t quite... See more
What''s important to know before going into this sequel, (assuming that you''ve read Ishmael already; aka the first book), is that My Ishmael''s aim is to re-tell the original lessons under a different context. This book''s intention is to reach out to readers that didn''t quite follow the lessons of the original Ishmael.

While that might sound like a waste of time to you, "Oh I read the first one, and I got everything because I''m smart", there are some lessons in here that rang as being more true to me than the original ones. The lesson about the food under lock and key especially stood out to me as being the best version of that lesson, and I''m rather confused why it isn''t used in the other versions. So even if you know every word of the first book by heart: this one can still provide something to you.

If you read my review of the first Ishmael, then you''ll know why I give the series a 4/5 stars. Since my pros and cons section will be near identical here; I''ll summarize it instead:

The books are amazing, go read them. They get 4 stars because they rely on each other to get the full message across, and that''s a flaw considering Daniel never intended a sequel, much less two sequels. My Ishmael and Story of B are course correction titles. Amazing course correction titles, surely, but unnecessary if the first book had succeeded at it''s intention.
3 people found this helpful
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Ruby Saffron
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Favorite of the trilogy!
Reviewed in the United States on May 30, 2021
This is my favorite book out of the Ishmael trilogy. I love it because it’s written in the voice of Julie, a 12-year-old who meets Ishmael. Daniel Quinn did an amazing job capturing the voice of an adolescent pre teenager! I also think this is the most humorous book of the... See more
This is my favorite book out of the Ishmael trilogy. I love it because it’s written in the voice of Julie, a 12-year-old who meets Ishmael. Daniel Quinn did an amazing job capturing the voice of an adolescent pre teenager! I also think this is the most humorous book of the trilogy. The banter between Julie and Ishmael is funny, deep and endearing. I highly recommend this book especially if you’ve already read Ishmael. Because this book gives the end story where Ishmael left off. ❤️🦍
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The Pilgrim
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Same Yet Beautifully Different
Reviewed in the United States on August 6, 2021
Each if the Ishmael books was an interesting, enlightening and challenging journey. Each one was an engaging and even entertaining teaching tool. But this one is my favorite because of Julie’s remarkable transformation. Granted, The Story of B also included a significant... See more
Each if the Ishmael books was an interesting, enlightening and challenging journey. Each one was an engaging and even entertaining teaching tool. But this one is my favorite because of Julie’s remarkable transformation. Granted, The Story of B also included a significant transformation. Yet, Julie’s was more poignant and inspiring.
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AshleighBenjamin&3kids
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
sparks some serious thought...and emotion
Reviewed in the United States on November 3, 2020
This book was so amazing. i absolutely loved it. it completely opened my eyes to things i always felt, but couldn''t articulate. I was in tears by the end of it. Highly, highly recommend. This book needs to be taught in schools. forget lord of the flies and Shakespeare... See more
This book was so amazing. i absolutely loved it. it completely opened my eyes to things i always felt, but couldn''t articulate. I was in tears by the end of it. Highly, highly recommend. This book needs to be taught in schools. forget lord of the flies and Shakespeare …Ishmael, My Ishmael, and the Story of B need to be on everyone''s reading list.
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Dr. Oceanfront
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful book, very easy read
Reviewed in the United States on March 18, 2014
This is the sequel to Ishmael. This time the student is a 12 year old, street wise little girl. She wants to know why we work am 8 hour day... The book is such an easy read, it was a pleasure. I enjoyed it very much and was sad when I knew I was coming to the... See more
This is the sequel to Ishmael. This time the student is a 12 year old, street wise little girl. She wants to know why we work am 8 hour day...

The book is such an easy read, it was a pleasure. I enjoyed it very much and was sad when I knew I was coming to the end. That rarely happens to me anymore.
There are great explanations of the book in the first few reviews, so I won''t rewrite them here.
If you like Ishmael, you will love this book too.
11 people found this helpful
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Suzanne Sheldon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Read this book years ago. Story was so moving I had to add it to my kindle selection
Reviewed in the United States on May 6, 2017
I read this book/story when my daughter was in high school 12-13 years ago. My Ishmael- was required reading for one of her classes. This story is very thought provoking and I have never forgotten how much I loved the story. My Ishmael should be read by every young/old... See more
I read this book/story when my daughter was in high school 12-13 years ago. My Ishmael- was required reading for one of her classes. This story is very thought provoking and I have never forgotten how much I loved the story. My Ishmael should be read by every young/old adult. The message will never go out of date, and relates to all people, cultures, ages, beliefs.
3 people found this helpful
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Joshua Christofferson
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Save the Planet, and Tie-up Loose Ends
Reviewed in the United States on January 12, 2004
Daniel Quinn''s My Ishmael is the third installment in his "Save the Earth" trilogy (Ishmael, The Story of B, and finally, My Ishmael). In this book, Ishmael, the telepathic gorilla, attempts to seal up some of his many loose ends found in Quinn''s previous two installments... See more
Daniel Quinn''s My Ishmael is the third installment in his "Save the Earth" trilogy (Ishmael, The Story of B, and finally, My Ishmael). In this book, Ishmael, the telepathic gorilla, attempts to seal up some of his many loose ends found in Quinn''s previous two installments by relaying his knowledge to a 12 year-old girl. I liked the first two books enough to keep on reading, however, Quinn''s style takes a grain of salt to take it all in.
The entire concept of the Quinn''s books are to convey to the reader that we "civilized" humans have developed, and entrenched ourselves, in a system of living that is doomed to fail. It''s not an anti-capitalism, pro-socialist treatise per se, however, most of the tenets of capitalism could be found flawed in Quinn''s assessment. Basically, Ishmael (Quinn) has determined that native peoples have survived for hundreds of thousands of years longer than "civilized" peoples because: a) tribal cultures don''t lock up their food so that you have to buy it (this locking up of food results in poverty, war, and dissent, according to Quinn); b) hunter/gather societies (with some agriculture) have been able to sustain their likelihood without disrupting family, wealth (in tribal terms), prosperity, and the environment.
Contrary to this, are the tenets of our "civilized" society. They lock up food (a substance that should be free to all humans just like air or water) and place it in the power of the wealthy who then redistribute it to those who can pay for it. This basic concept (capitalism, essentially) spawns a vast array of problems: poverty for those that can''t afford to pay for the simple necessities of life (no tribal system would allow any of its members to go hungry, simply because that would mean the degradation of the tribe); family degradation, war over who owns what, and crime in general because basic necessities are no longer open for the taking. Also, this "civilized" system can only grow and live if it constantly consumes (with no regard to replacing that which it consumes). So, on this note, Quinn is quite right; we cannot continually consume. There is simply not enough resources to sustain our population (and what do we do when we run out of resources? Traditionally, we destroy or displace other populations to gain their resources).
So, we''re all supposed to revert to some grand-scale tribal system (also known as socialism to some)? The 12 year-old girl asks exactly this. Ishmael (Quinn) makes a strong point here that he has never suggested such a thing. He is merely pointing out the flaws, and suggesting a starting point to fixing the problem. I can buy that on some levels, but mostly, he is suggesting that tribal systems are better than our current system, which is true on many levels, but a tribal system of living would be impossible with over 6 billion people on the planet (which, to Quinn''s defense, he poignantly acknowledges).
Overall, it''s a good read even if it leaves the reader with a million more questions (which I supposes is the whole point). Quinn leads the reader to believe in each of these books that his message is complete when in fact, it is far from it. He leads one to believe that he''s done his job as a "Save the world" teacher when in fact he leads much to be desired. However, with that said, Quinn''s book is definitely worth reading (start with the first book Ishmael). Even his conclusions are naive, they raise some vital questions about where our culture is heading. With all his flaws, Quinn is a must, if only to get you thinking in a completely different direction: can we continue to consume without replenishment, and while capitalism has proven extremely fruitful, is there a better form of capitalism that is more conducive to global prosperity on all levels?
39 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Most Excellent Book!
Reviewed in the United States on January 3, 2019
If you haven''t read this excellent Daniel Quinn story, then do yourself a favor and stop what you''re doing and order it as soon as you can!!
It is an excellent novel and it is not - repeat, not - biblical. Not even a little bit.]
Read it!!!!!
2 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Eric Holford
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting, but lightweight after Ishmael itself.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 21, 2013
I enjoyed this, but, as Ishmael is philosophy for simpletons, this is philosophy for immature simpletons. Someone once said to me that he divided the world between those who''d read Ishmael and those who hadn''t, but, if there is one person whose opinion I least admire, it''s...See more
I enjoyed this, but, as Ishmael is philosophy for simpletons, this is philosophy for immature simpletons. Someone once said to me that he divided the world between those who''d read Ishmael and those who hadn''t, but, if there is one person whose opinion I least admire, it''s him! I recommended Ishmael to my kids.
I enjoyed this, but, as Ishmael is philosophy for simpletons, this is philosophy for immature simpletons. Someone once said to me that he divided the world between those who''d read Ishmael and those who hadn''t, but, if there is one person whose opinion I least admire, it''s him! I recommended Ishmael to my kids.
One person found this helpful
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Mrs. Agnes Boddington
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thought provoking and mind changing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 2, 2000
Having first read Ishmael and now this book, I have just started on my third Daniel Quinn book "the Story of B". I have always thought along similar lines as the philosophy set out in these books, but now find that they are shaking my foundations: I am a teacher...See more
Having first read Ishmael and now this book, I have just started on my third Daniel Quinn book "the Story of B". I have always thought along similar lines as the philosophy set out in these books, but now find that they are shaking my foundations: I am a teacher and have started to question the whole educational system as a result of reading this book. Where do I go from here? As Ishmael says: You may reach one or a million people with the message. And that''s what I''ll try.
Having first read Ishmael and now this book, I have just started on my third Daniel Quinn book "the Story of B". I have always thought along similar lines as the philosophy set out in these books, but now find that they are shaking my foundations: I am a teacher and have started to question the whole educational system as a result of reading this book. Where do I go from here? As Ishmael says: You may reach one or a million people with the message. And that''s what I''ll try.
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Robert
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sehr interessante Thesen
Reviewed in Germany on August 15, 2015
Daniel Quinn lässt einen Orang-Utan erzählen, was seine Thesen zum grundlegenden Problem der immer weiter wachsenden Bevölkerung auf diesem unserem Planeten sind. In "Ishmael" und "My Ishmael" sucht Ishmael dabei einen Schüler, der ihm helfen soll die Welt...See more
Daniel Quinn lässt einen Orang-Utan erzählen, was seine Thesen zum grundlegenden Problem der immer weiter wachsenden Bevölkerung auf diesem unserem Planeten sind. In "Ishmael" und "My Ishmael" sucht Ishmael dabei einen Schüler, der ihm helfen soll die Welt zu retten. Einmal meldet sich ein Erwachsener, einmal ein Teen. Die Geschichten laufen parallel, haben aber nur wenige Berührungspunkte. Beide Bücher geben interessante Denkanstöße, Theorien zu Entwicklungen in Politik, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, Zusammenhänge zwischen Wirtschaft und Bevölkerungsentwicklung - denen man sogar folgen kann. Er zeigt auch Lösungsmöglichkeiten auf - Lösungsmöglichkeiten die vielleicht moralisch anstößig, außer - wie er sich ausdrückt " in unserer Kultur" - aber nirgends anstößig gefunden werden, da dies der normale Lauf des Lebens wäre..... Die Fortsetzung "The Story of B" - und hier erzählt dann ein Mensch "B" - verfolgt diese These weiter ...... Wer sich Gedanken zur Evolution des Menschen und zum Bevölkerungswachstum macht, sollte diese Bücher lesen.
Daniel Quinn lässt einen Orang-Utan erzählen, was seine Thesen zum grundlegenden Problem der immer weiter wachsenden Bevölkerung auf diesem unserem Planeten sind. In "Ishmael" und "My Ishmael" sucht Ishmael dabei einen Schüler, der ihm helfen soll die Welt zu retten. Einmal meldet sich ein Erwachsener, einmal ein Teen. Die Geschichten laufen parallel, haben aber nur wenige Berührungspunkte.
Beide Bücher geben interessante Denkanstöße, Theorien zu Entwicklungen in Politik, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, Zusammenhänge zwischen Wirtschaft und Bevölkerungsentwicklung - denen man sogar folgen kann. Er zeigt auch Lösungsmöglichkeiten auf - Lösungsmöglichkeiten die vielleicht moralisch anstößig, außer - wie er sich ausdrückt " in unserer Kultur" - aber nirgends anstößig gefunden werden, da dies der normale Lauf des Lebens wäre.....
Die Fortsetzung "The Story of B" - und hier erzählt dann ein Mensch "B" - verfolgt diese These weiter ......

Wer sich Gedanken zur Evolution des Menschen und zum Bevölkerungswachstum macht, sollte diese Bücher lesen.
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joe douglas
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thought provoking
Reviewed in Australia on July 25, 2018
I really enjoyed the previous two books and felt compelled to read this one. I was not disappointed and found yet another perspective to be very helpful. Thanks to Daniel for the many thousands of hours of deep thought, care, wisdom and love that he has poured into his...See more
I really enjoyed the previous two books and felt compelled to read this one. I was not disappointed and found yet another perspective to be very helpful. Thanks to Daniel for the many thousands of hours of deep thought, care, wisdom and love that he has poured into his books.
I really enjoyed the previous two books and felt compelled to read this one. I was not disappointed and found yet another perspective to be very helpful. Thanks to Daniel for the many thousands of hours of deep thought, care, wisdom and love that he has poured into his books.
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book
Reviewed in Australia on February 23, 2019
What a great book love it fowler''s on from ishmeal everyone should read it ot very interesting and funny and clever
What a great book love it fowler''s on from ishmeal everyone should read it ot very interesting and funny and clever
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